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A-16/Koeppen-Geiger_Observed_and_Predicted_Climate_Shifts (MapServer)

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Service Description: This service time enables a series of world maps for the extended period 1901-2100 to depict global trends in observed climate and projected climate change scenarios. These world maps were downloaded from the Institute for Veterinary Public Health’s website here: http://koeppen-geiger.vu-wien.ac.at/shifts.htm . This updated world map of Köppen-Geiger climate classification was based on temperature and precipitation observations for the period 1951–2000 from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) of the University of East Anglia and the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) at the German Weather Service. World maps for the period 2003–2100 are based on ensemble projections of global climate models provided by the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. The main results comprise an estimation of the shifts of climate zones within the 21st century by considering different Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scenarios from the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). Global temperature and precipitation projections for the period 2003–2100 were taken from the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research dataset, which comprises a total of 20 Global Climate Model (GCM) runs, combining 4 possible future worlds of emission scenarios described by SRES (ARNELL et al., 2004) with 5 state-of-the-art climate models. The emission scenarios were developed in the mid 1990s and are based on 4 different storylines to describe consistently the relationships between the forces driving emissions and their evolution and to add context for the scenario quantification. Each storyline represents different world futures: A world with quick economic growth and a quick launch of new and efficient technologies (A1), a very heterogenic world with focus on family values and local traditions (A2), a world without materialism and launch of clean technologies (B1) and a world with focus on local solutions for economic and ecological sustainability (B2). The variables in each model include population growth, economic development, energy use, efficiency of energy use, and mix of energy technologies, respectively. Additionally, the A1FI represents an A1 scenario where economic and technological growth is achieved through intensive fossil fuel use. The climate classification comprises a total of 31 climate classes described by a code of three letters noted in the attribute table as 'GRIDCODE.' The first letter describes the main classes, namely equatorial climates (A), arid climates (B), warm temperate climates (C), snow climates (D) and polar climates (E). The second letter accounts for precipitation and the third letter for temperature classes. The Map Service author also added 3 attribute fields to decode the letters for simpler use; in the attribute table, Main Climate, Precipitation, and Temperature correspond to these original coded letters. The legend also reflects these attributes rather than the coded letters. The largest shifts between the main classes of equatorial climate (A), arid climate (B), warm temperate climate (C), snow climate (D) and polar climate (E) on global land areas are estimated as 2.6–3.4 % (E to D), 2.2–4.7 % (D to C), 1.3–2.0 (C to B) and 2.1–3.2 % (C to A).

Map Name: Observed and Predicted Climate Shifts (1901-2100)

Legend

All Layers and Tables

Dynamic Legend

Dynamic All Layers

Layers: Tables: Description: This service time enables a series of world maps for the extended period 1901-2100 to depict global trends in observed climate and projected climate change scenarios. These world maps were downloaded from the Institute for Veterinary Public Health’s website here: http://koeppen-geiger.vu-wien.ac.at/shifts.htm This updated world map of Köppen-Geiger climate classification was based on temperature and precipitation observations for the period 1951–2000 from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) of the University of East Anglia and the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) at the German Weather Service. World maps for the period 2003–2100 are based on ensemble projections of global climate models provided by the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research. The main results comprise an estimation of the shifts of climate zones within the 21st century by considering different Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scenarios from the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES). Global temperature and precipitation projections for the period 2003–2100 were taken from the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research dataset, which comprises a total of 20 Global Climate Model (GCM) runs, combining 4 possible future worlds of emission scenarios described by SRES (ARNELL et al., 2004) with 5 state-of-the-art climate models. The emission scenarios were developed in the mid 1990s and are based on 4 different storylines to describe consistently the relationships between the forces driving emissions and their evolution and to add context for the scenario quantification. Each storyline represents different world futures: A world with quick economic growth and a quick launch of new and efficient technologies (A1), a very heterogenic world with focus on family values and local traditions (A2), a world without materialism and launch of clean technologies (B1) and a world with focus on local solutions for economic and ecological sustainability (B2). The variables in each model include population growth, economic development, energy use, efficiency of energy use, and mix of energy technologies, respectively. Additionally, the A1FI represents an A1 scenario where economic and technological growth is achieved through intensive fossil fuel use. The climate classification comprises a total of 31 climate classes described by a code of three letters noted in the attribute table as 'GRIDCODE.' The first letter describes the main classes, namely equatorial climates (A), arid climates (B), warm temperate climates (C), snow climates (D) and polar climates (E). The second letter accounts for precipitation and the third letter for temperature classes. The Map Service author also added 3 attribute fields to decode the letters for simpler use; in the attribute table, Main Climate, Precipitation, and Temperature correspond to these original coded letters. The legend also reflects these attributes rather than the coded letters. The largest shifts between the main classes of equatorial climate (A), arid climate (B), warm temperate climate (C), snow climate (D) and polar climate (E) on global land areas are estimated as 2.6–3.4 % (E to D), 2.2–4.7 % (D to C), 1.3–2.0 (C to B) and 2.1–3.2 % (C to A).

Copyright Text: Institute for Veterinary Public Health, Climatic Research Unit (CRU), Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC), German Weather Service, University of East Anglia, Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

Spatial Reference: 102100  (3857)


Single Fused Map Cache: false

Initial Extent: Full Extent: Time Info: Units: esriMeters

Supported Image Format Types: PNG32,PNG24,PNG,JPG,DIB,TIFF,EMF,PS,PDF,GIF,SVG,SVGZ,BMP

Document Info: Supports Dynamic Layers: true

MaxRecordCount: 1000

MaxImageHeight: 4096

MaxImageWidth: 4096

Supported Query Formats: JSON, AMF, geoJSON

Min Scale: 0

Max Scale: 0

Supports Datum Transformation: true



Child Resources:   Info   Dynamic Layer

Supported Operations:   Export Map   Identify   Find   Return Updates   Generate KML